Category Archives: St George’s Church

Let Us Remember

Wars affect not just individuals but whole communities, so it is fitting that remembrance is a community event, particularly this year when we have been commemorating the centenary of the end of World War One.

In Badshot Lea and Hale we held two community events on November 7 and 8, as well as services of Remembrance at the war memorials and in the churches.  On November 7 at St John’s Church, the community gathered together to pause and remember those who had died in the conflicts past and present. The Farnham Town Crier Jonathan Jones read some poetry and the year 6 children from William Cobbett school read In Flanders Fields and  a combined parish choir sang A flower remembered and Circle us Lord.

The idea for the evening was to encourage those attending to remember but also to live as people of peace and reconciliation so we drew the formal part of the evening to a close by singing Shalom. After the service, hospitality was offered by the congregation of St John’s and the display of art work and poetry was enjoyed by all who attended. The display will be available in the church until November 19.

The next day we held a similar event at St George’s Church. The Farnham Mayor and his wife joined members of the community in a packed church.

Badshot Lea Infant School had been working for a few weeks on fantastic art and poetry which was displayed around the church. There was also poetry on display from other members of the community, including a poem by Leslie Morrel to his wife Eva written in 1942. Unfortunately, Leslie lost his life during WW2 and is listed on the Badshot Lea War Memorial. Eva, now aged 96, still lives in the village.

The children from the school entertained us with some lovely singing and the Parish choir helped led Pack up your troubles and It’s a long way to Tipperary.

As with the St John’s event, we wanted to encourage people to remember but also to strive for peace and reconciliation. After the service, hospitality was offered by the congregation of St George’s and the display of art work and poetry was enjoyed by all who attended. A huge thanks to Badshot Lea Infants teachers, pupils and parents who helped make this event such a success.

At St Mark’s, the local Beavers, Cubs and Scouts joined us at the Hale war memorial and then walked up the hill for the Sunday service at which their standards were received by the church. The church itself was filled with Remembrance art created by the community, in part during the Sunday services leading up to November 11 and at Thursday morning art. There was also a prayer station which focused our minds on the individuals who had died in armed conflict, allowing us to reflect on the personal loss that war brings.

Afterwards Scouts, Cubs, Beavers and other guests joined the congregation for coffee and conversation, and a lot of biscuits!

 

 

 

Community Remembrance events

November 7 and 8
As we approach Remembrance Sunday, we are holding two community remembrance events to which everyone is invited.

On Wednesday (November 7) at 7pm, St John’s will be hosting an community remembrance event which will include performances of songs and poems by William Cobbett School and a combined parish choir.

Then on Thursday (8th) at 3pm, St George’s will be hosting a community remembrance event. This time there will be performances of songs and poems by Badshot Lea Infant School and a combined parish choir.

At both of these, there will be an art exhibition and poetry displayed. Please get involved by submitting poems and art around the theme of Remembrance and by coming along to share hospitality with the community.

 

 

 

Picture by Pierre Best, Unsplash

All Souls’ services

All Souls’ Day is held on November 2 and we are marking this by holding three simple services over the weekend of  November 3 and 4 to remember those who have died.

They are at each of the three churches:

St John’s at 6.30pm on Saturday, November 3
St Mark’s at 11am on Sunday, November 4 and
St George’s at 4pm on Sunday, November 4.

In these we will be lighting candles and bringing our loved ones to mind. The services are open to everyone, regardless of faith or no faith.

Please stay for coffee and cake after the services.all souls

You are invited to a Harvest supper

Carry on celebrating Harvest tonight (Saturday) with a Harvest Supper at St George’s Church, Badshot Lea, starting at 6pm.

There will be a buffet meal, a Harvest raffle and entertainment. Please bring your own drinks. Donations to the raffle will be gratefully received.

Got a party piece? Give Lesley Crawley a call on 01252 820537 to let her know.

Tickets – £8, children £5 – are on sale from: St Mark’s – Jenny Bull 01252 326437, St George’s – Carol Le Page 01252 492415, St John’s – June Jasper, junemargaretjasper@gmail.com or 07807 881311.

Main picture Aneta Ivanova, Unsplash

 

Harvest Supper

 

Celebrate Harvest!

Don’t forget it is Harvest Festival tomorrow (Sunday, October 7). Come along, sing your favourite harvest hymns and celebrate the bounty of the Earth.

You can share that bounty too – please bring tinned or dried food for the Foodbank, particularly instant mash, tinned meat, sponge puddings, jam, tinned tomatoes, UHT milk, long life fruit juice, tinned potatoes, chocolate and pasta sauce.

The times are: 9:30am at St John’s, Hale; 10am at St George’s, Badshot Lea; 11am at St Mark’s, Upper Hale; 11.30am St John’s for All; 11:30am Worship for All at St George’s.

There will be cake sales in aid of Christian Aid after the services at St John’s and St George’s, and at St Mark’s it will be Apple Day, from 10am. Read more here

Collection to help refugees

For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’ (Matthew 25:25-36)

FHR collection Oct 18It is time to sort through our wardrobes and cupboards again ready for another collection organised by Farnham Help for Refugees in UK and Overseas and taking place on October 5 from 3-7pm in St George’s Church.

The clothes, toiletries, baby items and medical and other equipment which are collected in (see above for what is needed) will then be distributed to other groups who have direct links to refugees either in this country or overseas. For instance, a car full of supplies, particularly toiletries and feminine hygiene products, always goes down to Portsmouth where the Red Cross distribute it among refugees already in the country. Other supplies are taken to groups such as High Wycombe Helping Others which sends container loads out to countries like Lebanon and Greece which are currently home to thousands of refugees, particularly from Syria.

Members of the group also take clothing and supplies overseas themselves which gives them a clear idea of what is specifically needed. One of the members of the group was on the Greek island of Lesbos last month where thousands of people continue to arrive seeking refuge from war and persecution in their home countries.

Another member is Penny Hardcastle from St George’s who will be driving to Calais with a car full of contributions in October which she will pass to the organisation Help Refugees. She will also stay to help with sorting and food and clothing distribution.

This will be Penny’s second trip to Calais – the first last December opened her eyes to the plight of desperate people there. “Calais is very depressing,” said Penny. “Most of the people there have fled from life or death situations and they way they are treated by the police is terrible. It was bitterly cold when I was there and there were people out there with no shelter. They don’t have tents because of the police brutality – they are forced to move on so don’t have time to put up tents. They sleep in the woods. It snowed when I was there and then there was torrential rain and that was even worse.

“But the people were so positive and friendly and there was a lot of camaraderie among them. Most of them were men – the families don’t tend to be there – and many had friends and family in England. I met one man who had a business in Birmingham and had been deported and just wanted to get back there. I met intelligent, skilled people who want to contribute.”

Among the items that Penny will be taking to Calais are men’s winter clothes in small-to-medium sizes and shoes in sizes seven to nine (40-43). “The men tend to be of slim build – partly how they are and also they have often walked for many months – and they don’t have the large European feet. Clothes to fit teenage boys would be good. The men want to look nice, to maintain their dignity.

“It may feel like a small thing, turning up at the collection with a pair of shoes say, but it really does help. And these are all dignified humans. If I were in that position I would like to think that there were people who would want to help me.”

To find out more or to offer help with sorting and packing, contact farnhamhelpforrefugees@gmail.com

penny in calais

Penny in Calais last year.

God above us, within us and at the bottom of the garden

A Celtic Service

God above us – trees, birds and sunshine, stars and moonlight – God above us.

God within us – hope, tears and laughter, love and wonder – God within us.

A few weeks ago I was chatting with my son about the Celtic service at St George’s I was going to be taking part in, with Wendy Edwards and Dave and Helena Walker. As a joke – I think – he asked  Is that where you paint your face blue and dance around with no clothes on?”

I said that was not what we would be doing and he seemed disappointed ! However it did make me think that other people may have similar ideas.

So to reassure everyone, on Saturday, July 14 at 5pm, 22 of us met in the garden of St. George’s for a Celtic Service. The weather and setting were just right.

Wendy led our worship beautifully with words and prayers, and told us how she found God at the bottom of her garden. Helena and Dave prepared an area for us do do various art activities, and brought a large Celtic cross they had painted.

We sang some familiar hymns and some new songs and sang The Lord’s Prayer to the tune of Auld Lang Syne.

Afterwards we all stayed to chat over refreshments of shortbread, Welsh cakes and homemade fruit bread, with tea and coffee.

It was a beautiful service. Thank you Wendy. I look forward to the next one.

Margaret Emberson

PS And we did NOT paint our faces blue and dance around with no clothes on!

 

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If you went down to the church that day you were sure of a big surprise!

 

For outside we gathered (on July 8) for a Teddy Bears’ – and all sorts of cuddly friends’ – picnic. While they sat and made friends,  we spoke about how we can tell our teddies all of our innermost secrets, confess what we have done wrong and know that they will always love us, a bit like God! As we get older, we learn more and our view of our teddy changes. As we grow up, our view of God changes too. We have opportunities to grow in our spiritual commitment and come closer to the Lord. Our choir sang the ‘Gloria’ – you can see them in the picture – and sang hymns and had a lovely time together. We finished off with non-alcoholic ‘Pimms’ and cakes.

Maxine Everitt

Ministry team grows again

Wendy Edwards, Bishop Andrew and Craig Nobbs outside St Paul's, Dorking, after the serviceThe ministry team in the parish has grown again. With the licensing of Wendy and Craig as Licensed Lay Ministers (LLMs) last Saturday the team has grown to three full-time clergy, three LLMs and two retired clergy who still conduct services, preach and carry out pastoral work in the parish.

Wendy Edwards and Craig Nobbs were both licensed to the parish by the Bishop of Guildford, the Right Rev’d Andrew Watson in a service at St Paul’s, Dorking.

Wendy, the daughter of renowned local journalists Ted Parratt and the late Jean Parratt, started her training in Southwark, but returned to her childhood home of Farnham in 2017, following her mother’s death the previous year, and continued her training with the Diocese of Guildford.

“I returned to the church in 2007 after a very difficult time in my life, and I felt a calling to ministry but it was too early,” she said. “The feeling came again at the end of 2013 and I started exploring it and began my training in 2014. Licensed Lay Ministry is a preaching and teaching ministry in a pastoral context and I will have a particular funeral ministry. In my previous job I worked as a chartered legal executive specialising in wills and probate. I always supported people around the time of deaths in the family through the legal side and felt a call to support them through ministry.”

Wendy will be particularly attached to St John’s, Hale, the church she chose to go to when she returned to Farnham, in part because she had been a bridesmaid there twice in the late 1960s.

Craig Nobbs was already an LLM when he moved to Farnham 18 months ago but was licensed to another parish and wanted to continue his ministry in his new home. He has been relicensed to the Parish of Badshot Lea and Hale and his ministry will mostly be at St George’s, Badshot Lea.

Speaking after the service Craig said: “The service was out of this world and an affirmation of what I am doing in the parish. This parish is one with a big heart. During the licensing service I was conscious of waves of love from both the parish and from God himself. What kept going through my mind was a line ‘Ransomed, healed, restored, forgiven’ (from the hymn Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven), as that has been my experience.”

Craig’s ministry will mostly be at the weekend as he works full-time in London as a Whitehall civil servant taking a lead in educational policy.

Lesley Crawley added: “We are delighted and blessed to have both Wendy and Craig with us and look forward to their continuing ministry as the parish grows and seeks to express the love of God in our community”.