Tag Archives: music

Music for the Service of the Word – 22nd October 11am

This service will be largely sung. Many of the hymns and songs will be familiar, but just in case, these are links to most of them. We may not sing them in exactly the same way, but these links should give you a good idea of how they go.

1st hymn:            I went down to the river to pray
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbgfQ48hWuY

Penitence:           Be still for the presence of the Lord
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZugvUQ4m90U

Gloria:                  Peruvian              Usual St Marks way

Collect:                10000 reasons
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtwIT8JjddM

Reading:              Turn, turn, turn (based on Ecclesiastes 3 1-8)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4ga_M5Zdn4

Sermon:               Now is the cool of the day (Lesley solo, acapella)

Creed:                 Seward (I D Sankey, 1892)             Can’t find a link, but it’s very simple

Intercession:       It’s me O Lord, standing in the need of prayer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x90HfUJl6eY

Kumbayah
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3MiD_U4CHQ

Thanksgiving:     Thank you Lord for this new day
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njsdfxK9FcQ

Lord’s prayer:     Caribbean version from “Come and Praise”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgP0jI5hghU

Peace:                  Hevenu shalom Aleichem (Jewish chant)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JB4RMIWroMY

Blessing:              Amazing Grace                  Usual St Marks way

Dismissal:            You shall go out with joy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unWnWSgoSt0

I’ll name that Hymn in One!

As many will know, Barry Hall has moved with his family to Bournemouth and Frances Whewell has agreed to be the new Parish Organist, playing at all three churches at various times in the month.

Frances will also be choosing the music, and together with her we are developing a “Repertoire” for each service.  That is a number of hymns which the congregation knows and loves, and which we will be able to sing about three times a year on average.  This restricts the number of hymns that we can sing, but means that when we sing them we will be more confident, and newcomers have some chance of getting to know the hymns and songs.

In drawing up such a list we are almost certain to get it wrong, and although we have been discussing this with the Worship Groups for each church, we would also like to offer everybody the opportunity to look at the list and offer their views – there is no guarantee that this will change the list in cases of personal favourites, but where it highlights an obvious mistake it allows us to correct it.

The lists are available on the web here.  Please do let me know

  1. what we have forgotten
  2. what we have included that no one knows (or likes!)

Weight of numbers will probably count for something in determining which changes get made.

Alan Crawley

Photo thanks to Georgie Fry

“It has always been done this way”

One of the difficulties when reading the Bible is to determine which elements are culturally conditioned from the time of writing, and which are eternal truths.  This is not an easy task.

However, the same is true of many of the things that we take for granted in our churches today.  This is the start of an occasional series looking at some church history – particularly in the area of churches and worship.

This month I shall begin with church music.

Organs did not appear in general use in churches until about the 12th Century as music was associated with heathen cults.  Prior to this the music was not sung, but chanted and consisted primarily of the Psalms.

Hymns as we would recognise them started being written in the 17th and 18th centuries, with Charles Wesley a major contributor.  Carols only started being sung in church in the late 18th and early 19th centuries (having been sung outside church earlier in history).

In the 19th century the organ started to replace the Parish Band and hymns were introduced into the service – often with a robed choir.  Until then most Church of England Churches did not have music in the service; however they might have a Parish Band who would play at the end of the service.  This is because the Book of Common Prayer contains very few references to music, and where it most obviously does it referred to Cathedrals and College Chapels.

In 20th Century in some churches Parish bands started to reappear, often with electric guitars and drums, but also in a folk style.

So hymns as many would recognise them in the service have been a feature of worship for about 200 years, and modern worship songs have been around for about 50 – out of the 2,000 year life of the church.

Alan Crawley

Photo thanks to Georgie Fry

A change of hands on the Keyboards

It was a huge surprise in January when Lesley suddenly asked me if I would like to step into Barry’s organ shoes from early summer. I had to think about it for a while, as I was then singing in the choir at St Andrew’s in Farnham, and occasionally playing the organ there.

But I was drawn to the idea of helping with the music at all three churches in the Parish of Badshot Lea and Hale – it seemed like riches galore! It is a great honour to take up this post, and very exciting to help Lesley and Alan explore new musical ideas for worship. I hope to help Pamela in a small way with the St John’s choir, and learn about voice production in the ‘Voice for Life’ scheme for choral musicians. Perhaps we’ll be able to sing some simple anthems before long.

Musical traditions are being exchanged at St Mark’s – Bob Shatwell with his ‘folk fiddle’ is teaching me to ‘vamp the chords’ on the piano to accompany him in ‘All God’s creatures got a place in the choir’! I’ve yet to perfect this technique! In turn I’m helping Bob with some classical music, and at Easter we played some peaceful Bach after Communion, and joyful Bach at the end of the service.

The project to fundraise for St Mark’s Edwardian organ, ‘Emily’, is only just beginning. When her lovely mellow tone is restored, she can be used for the grander hymns, and so the music will be more diverse.

In April Barry invited me to the fortnightly Band practice at St George’s, and I was very impressed with the young people’s great enthusiasm in playing violins, flute, clarinet, and drums, with Barry on treble recorder. Margaret conducts from the piano with verve and humour which is infectious. I enjoyed choir practice there too. As I left Barry put the recorder under my arm saying, “you can play this now”! Never having played one before, we’ll see what happens in two weeks time!

My first task has been to choose the hymns for all three churches. They have individual styles of worship, and so the hymns have to be appropriate, and suit the theme of each service. We hope to enlarge the repertoire with modern hymns whose tunes are pleasing to all ears, if possible! Debates over hymns can become heated, but I hope we can all achieve harmony with our voices and our opinions, and together make ‘ a joyful noise unto the Lord’. Church music should create the right mood; it can be balm to the soul, it can break through depression, it can ‘call us back to life’.

There may also be a modern organ voluntary at the end of services sometimes. I hope you will allow that! I’m grateful for the support of my fellow organists at St John’s, and for all the encouragement from Lesley, Alan, Pamela and Barry. Thank you, everyone, for this great opportunity.

Frances Whewell