Category Archives: Vocation

Election Results 2017 (PCC not Country!)

At the Annual Church Meetings held on Sunday 30th April the following were elected:

Ex Officio
Lesley Crawley
Alan Crawley
Lesley Shatwell
Hannah Moore

Churchwardens:
Carol Le Page
Pamela Marsham
Bob Shatwell

Deputy Churchwardens:
Margaret Emberson
Maxine Everitt

PCC Members:
John Boas
Gemma Brown
Sylvie Burrows
Angela Hall
Kris Lawrence
Annie Thomas
Bill Thomas
Diana Thomas
Stella Wiseman

Co-opted Members:
Sarah Kay
Vicky Kidney

Other Church Officers

Secretary:
Gemma Brown

Treasurer:
Sarah Kay

Safeguarding Officer
Maurice Emberson

Electoral Roll Officer
Jennifer Paterson

Stewardship Officer
Peter Paterson

Celebration of Ministry and APCM

A date for your diary : Sunday 30th April at 6:30PM at St George’s Church Room. Come and join the celebration of all that is good and find out about aspects of life in our Parish with which you may not be too familiar. There will be cheese and wine to sustain you while you chat, look at photos and have fun. We have achieved so much in the last year and hope to do even more in the future. This will be followed at 7:30PM by the Annual Meetings.

We will be printing very few Annual Meeting booklets this year so please find it electronically here. Also, please find these documents by clicking on them:

2017 Agenda for Annual Parochial Church Meeting
2017 Agenda for Annual Meeting of Parishioners

2016 Minutes of the Annual Parochial Church Meeting
2016 Minutes of the Annual Meeting of Parishioners

Gemma Brown

PCC Secretary

Reflections on my ordination

And then the Bishop laid his hands on me….

The moment on the 3rd of July at my ordination when Bishop Andrew laid his hand on my head and asked God to “Send down the Holy Spirit on your servant Hannah for the office and work of a deacon in your Church” was the culmination of a journey of discernment towards ordination which began 20 years ago. This journey began at the altar rail in St Paul’s Anglican Chapel in Parkhurst, Johannesburg. On receiving communion one Sunday morning I had a sense that God was calling me to ordained ministry. I put it out of my mind to focus on my teaching career and having a family. About 6 years ago my then vicar, David Price, asked me if I had ever considered being ordained and that earlier prompting come flooding back.

The journey has intensified over the last three years during my formal training at St Mellitus Theological College. Training towards ordination is a process which is designed to stretch and grow you, it makes you feel incredibly vulnerable, it unpacks everything you believe and it puts you back together – hopefully stronger than before. It is a process which involves many hellos and a fair few goodbyes. It has meant moving and redefining who I am, how I see myself and how others see me.

From the Thursday before my ordination on the 3rd July, I was on a retreat with 12 other ordinands at St Columba’s House, Woking. The initial part of the retreat was at Charterhouse School Chapel to run through the ordination service. During this rehearsal, I had walked around in my cassock for the first time. I had butterflies in my tummy and it all felt slightly surreal.

After the rehearsal we headed off to the retreat house. The next 36 hours was to be in silence. It is amazing how quickly you develop into a community even in silence. You have to figure out how to attract someone’s attention if you want them to pass the salt and pepper. Humans have this built in desire to laugh and when you are in silence the silliest things, which under normal circumstance you might not notice, suddenly seem funny. One of the other ordinands is a Wine Sommelier and he conducted a wine tasting in silence but with lots of exaggerated sound effects which was very amusing.

My family maintained “radio silence” during the retreat and this was challenging because I missed them and also there was a realisation that this was something I had to do on my own with God. The three days of retreat were a blessed time with God that I spent reflecting on my journey to this point and looking forward with excitement and trepidation to the road ahead.

Waiting to be ordained evoked memories of the feelings of expectation I experienced before my children were born – I knew my life was about to change, I had been preparing for this moment but I had no idea what to expect and how much things would change. These feelings were intensified as we waved goodbye to the first group of Ordinands who set off for the 10am service.

I arrived at Charterhouse School Chapel at the same time as Michael, Rachael and Reuben but we had been told that we could only go and greet our families after the service so I had to wave to them across the field.

Whilst getting dressed in my cassock and surplice there was lots of huffing and puffing as I tried to calm my nerves! One last pit stop to the toilet before getting into the procession and then we were off. Whilst walking down the crowded aisle I picked out the faces of family and friends who had come to support me, I don’t think I stopped smiling.

Right up to the moment Bishop Andrew laid his hands on me, I expected a flood of tears, in fact I was even clutching a tissue, just in case. But this did not happen. Instead, I felt overwhelmed by a sense of God’s presence and a feeling of complete peace and calm.
Afterwards, being greeted by so many well wishers was incredible and the welcome the family and I have received in the Parish was wonderful.

Much later, once my close family had headed home, I sat on the settee and simply exhaled. I was brought back to earth with a bump as Rachael needed help with her homework, Mike needed some help tidying up the kitchen and Reuben needed to be encouraged into bed. This is what the next part of my journey in ordained ministry will be – balancing ministry and family life – something which all Moore family will be learning together.

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Licensing: is it just about being “done”?

On 25 June this year, I made promises to God and to Bishop Andrew.  Promises such as declaring “my belief in the faith which is revealed in the Holy Scriptures”, my “obedience to the Bishop of Guildford … in all things lawful and honest”.  I promised that I would “promote peace and unity” – that’s a big ask these days, I think I might have my work cut out on that one alone.  And also I promised to be obedient “to the minister in whose cure I may serve” – that’s obedient to Alan and Lesley – but only provided that what they ask of me is lawful and honest.  Heavy, solemn promises … crikey, what brought me to this point?

And people ask me, “What’s it like now you’re ‘done’?”.

Well, it’s been a long journey, for me and for all those who have supported, guided, helped and prayed for me.  Thank you to you all – particularly Alan and Lesley and especially my poor, long-suffering husband Bob.  Three years: 39 pieces of marked work (average 60% mark), Monday evenings over at Guildford, residentials, sermons, parish placement …

But what is it really like being “done”?

If I’m honest, I remember little of the day itself.  The week before, I had finished my final assignment on the practical aspects of pastoral care, so all my coursework was done.  Nothing left hanging over me, but through that week, I became more aware of a deep feeling which had started as unease, morphed through worry into a state of panic, tinged with excitement.  Dear God, am I ready for all of this?

“You’ll be fine, no need to worry, it’s normal to get butterflies …”  Yes, I’m sure it is all right for you.  But this is me, I’m the first person ever in the whole world to feel apprehension – er well, maybe I exaggerate a bit … Actually, the most helpful comment I received during this time was from a lady at St John’s who assured me that already she could see the joy of God within me as I inhabited the role of minister.  What a lovely thing to say, thank you.

So the great day finally came.  The service was scheduled for 5.30 pm at St Peter’s, Farnborough.  I and my fellow Licensed Lay Ministers-in-waiting had spent the day in shared, quiet study and preparation – by now, the butterflies had turned into giant pterodactyls and I was a bit shaky.  Would Beki, my daughter make it, would Mum manage to get into the church in the wheelchair, would I stumble over the words in my reading or perhaps trip over my robes?  Oh heck!

But then, we made our promises to Bishop Andrew and lined up to go into church for the service where we would be “done”.  Waiting in the procession outside in the sunshine, I felt a huge sense of relief.  I’d made it!  Beki had arrived safely, Mum was carefully installed at the end of a row, I could almost quote the Old Testament reading I’d rehearsed it so much.  My friends, family and supporters all ready to cheer me on and the sun shone.  Now all I had to do was pledge my life to God.

Do you know the feeling, when so much is going on around you, you are caught up in the midst of it all and you simply go where you are told and do what you’re told?  At times, the service felt a bit like that.  But somewhere between the time outside when I had felt sense of relief and part way through the service when we sang “Bless the Lord, Oh my soul”, nervous anxiety had done a complete somersault into pure joy so I could “sing like never before …”  There is such depth to God’s love and at times, very special times, we are able to catch a glimpse of God’s love at work in our lives.

“Done”?  I’ve only just begun!

Introducing our Curate Hannah

My name is Hannah Moore and in a few weeks time I will be moving into your Parish with my family to work and worship with you.

I was born in Bedfordshire, but at the age of five, I moved to South Africa with my parents and sister for a short work contract of two years. We ended up staying for 23 years. I met my husband, Michael, whilst at school and we have been married for 20 years. We have two children, Rachael and Reuben.  Michael is a teacher and works at a secondary school in Fleet.

I qualified as a teacher and taught at a primary school before I had Rachael. I have also worked in the private sector on the planning and development of a Titanium mine. When we returned to England, I set up my own business in partnership with my sister and my mum running After School Craft clubs, which I did until I started my training for ministry.

Over the last three years, I have been studying at St Mellitus Theological College in London, as well as working for the Church on the Heath where I was training in ministry,  and at  All Saints Church in Fleet as a Children’s and Families worker.

When I am not working I love to watch sport. I am mad about cricket so enjoy watching England and I try to keep up with where Liverpool FC is in the Premier League table – not close enough to the top for my liking! I can also be seen out and about walking our two dogs (and the cats that often come as well.) I also love to relax with a good book or challenge myself with a jigsaw puzzle. Now that I have finished a very intense period of my academic studies I am looking forward to being a happy strummer on my guitar again.

Please continue to pray for my family as we prepare to move. Moving can be stressful, so I am keeping the words of my favourite Psalm in mind during this time as we sort out cupboards and say our goodbyes in Fleet., “I lift up my eyes to the hills from where will my help come? My help comes from the Lord” (Ps121).

Michael, Rachael, Reuben and I are really excited to be moving into your parish and getting to know you all.

Hannah Moore

**Hannah is being ordained at Charterhouse on 3rd July at 3pm – all welcome. All welcome to come back to St George’s straight afterwards for bring and share meal – at about 5:30pm.

 

My Licensing as LLM

“For Reader [Licensed Lay Minister], one should be appointed after he[she] has been carefully proved; no babbler, nor drunkard, nor jester; of good morals, submissive, of benevolent intentions, first in the assembly at the meetings on the Lord’s Day, of a plain utterance, and capable of clearly expounding, mindful that he[she] assumes the position of an Evangelist …” This comes from “The Apostolic Church Order” which was published before 200 AD. Readers (LLMs) have been around for a good few hundred years, although it wasn’t until 1969 when women were first licensed.

I have been studying for the last three years so that I can be licensed to minister in this parish. At times it has seemed a very long time indeed and now, at last, on 25 June I will be licensed by Bishop Andrew at St Peter’s Farnborough together with my two fellow students and perhaps others renewing their license for this diocese. I will have completed three years of training in topics as diverse as Christian Ethics, how to prepare and give a sermon, Bible Studies – hermeneutics (Old and New Testaments – and a bit of the Apocrypha!), Church History, Mission and Evangelism (didn’t enjoy that one much), Doctrine – that was probably my favourite – oh and Spirituality and Pastoral Theology. And in my spare time, I’ve been attending church!

So I am coming to the end of this part of my studies (I have another four years within the system still because the Church of England doesn’t let anyone loose that quickly, there’s no knowing what I might say to you!). Alan and I have been discussing my future role within the parish, particularly because I won’t be the only newcomer in July: Hannah will be joining us as curate. As a lay minister, I have a certain degree of flexibility about my ministry, so I am still on a voyage of discovery. I am interested in creative worship and different ways of exploring God – prayer stations, labyrinth, music, art, storytelling, play. God calls every one of us. And God gives us gifts to serve Him and to share with others. We are happiest and at our most alive when we walk within our God-given-gifts. God has called me to become a Licensed Lay Minister here and I am so excited to discover where He leads me in my ministry.

But for the time being, I invite you all to come to my licensing:

St Peter’s Farnborough, Saturday 25 June, 5 for 5.30 pm.

If you can’t get to my licensing, perhaps I will see you in church on Sunday 26 June when I will be racing round the whole parish to see as many of you as I can at each of our churches. At St Mark’s we will be sharing a buffet lunch at 12 noon – please come along.

Licensing, hum … I suppose it will be proved that I’m no babbler and I think my morals are good and I certainly have benevolent intentions.

Lesley Shatwell

 

Marking 150 years of Reader Ministry

 

Lesley Shatwell, our LLM in training helped St John’s and St Mark’s mark the 150th anniversary of the restoration of Reader ministry in the Church of England by preaching this sermon (well sort-of, she got heckled at St Mark’s so didn’t get through it all… ).

“For Reader, one should be appointed after he has been carefully proved; no babbler, nor drunkard, nor jester; of good morals, submissive, of benevolent intentions, first in the assembly at the meetings on the Lord’s Day, of a plain utterance, and capable of clearly expounding, mindful that he assumes the position of an Evangelist; for whoever fills the ear of the ignorant will be accounted as having his name written with God.”  This comes from “The Apostolic Church Order” which was published before 200 AD.  Mind you, by AD 500, the position of “Reader” had fallen into decline.  It wasn’t until 1561 that the office was revived, but then there were very clear rules:  a Reader was to ‘move men to quiet and concord, and not give them cause for offence’.  They weren’t allowed to do the important things like administering the sacraments, but they were allowed to bury the dead.  Oh and it goes without saying they could not be women.  It seems as though they were a cheap form of priest.

However, 150 years ago on Ascension Day 1866, the office of Reader was revived for a second time.  It happened during a time of huge expansion of the church, particularly within cities of the industrial north and there simply weren’t enough vicars to cope.  Readers took on the role of teacher in Sunday Schools, leading worship in mission halls and teaching Bible classes.  Being lay ministers, they were seen as bridging the gap between the ordained clergy and parishioners.  One clergyman even describing them as ‘the better educated from among the uneducated’ – what a disparaging view of his parishioners that man must have had!

The First World War turned many people’s lives upside down and inside out.  Readers were encouraged to preach during the evening service.  After the war, the element of preaching was retained.  In the 1920s, the first national organisation specifically for Readers was created.  Readers were given better training and standards were raised.

However, it wasn’t until 1969 when women were first licensed – just think what the world had been missing in all those years!  And today, according to the Church of England website, there are more than 10,000 active Readers in the Church of England.

In 2009, the name Licensed Lay Minister (LLM) was coined to replace the term “Reader”.  It was thought to reflect more clearly exactly what we do, but I am not sure it does.  Yes, we do more than read – although through my course I have wondered about that as I wade through the mountain of set books!  We are ministers of the church, but we are laity.  We get into all kinds of places, most are licensed to a parish but some are chaplains in prisons, hospitals, hospices or schools and a few are in charge of parishes.  We have been described as ‘theological resource people working within a pastoral context’.  But what does that really mean?  And more particularly, what does it mean to me and our parish?  On 25 June, provided I pass my remaining assignments, Bishop Andrew will license me to this parish – yes you are stuck with me, I’m not being moved on to another parish.  I will have completed three years of training in topics as diverse as Christian Ethics, how to prepare and give a sermon, Bible Studies – hermeneutics (Old and New Testaments – and a bit of the Apocrypha!), Church History, Mission and Evangelism (didn’t enjoy that one much), Doctrine – that was probably my favourite – oh and Spirituality and Pastoral Theology.  And in my spare time, I’ve been attending church!

So I am coming to the end of this part of my studies (I have another four years within the system still – oh the Church of England doesn’t let anyone loose that quickly, there’s no knowing what I might do to you!).  Alan and I have been discussing my future role within the parish, particularly because I won’t be the only newcomer in July:  Hannah will be joining us as curate (hooray!).  As a lay minister, I have a certain degree of flexibility about my ministry, so I am still on a voyage of discovery.  As you look around you will see an art installation here (come back this afternoon – between 2 and 4 and there will be tea, scones and music too).  I am interested in creative worship and different ways of exploring God – prayer stations, labyrinth, music, art, storytelling, play … wow – now I’m getting carried away!

God calls every one of us.  And God gives us gifts to serve Him and to share with others.  We are happiest and at our most alive when we walk within our God-given-gifts.  God has called me to become a Licensed Lay Minister here and I am so excited to discover where He leads me in my ministry.

Listen, is God calling you?

Welcoming our new Curate

For those who don’t know, this summer we are getting a curate in the parish, Hannah Moore. So what is a curate?

She will be a curate in training, which means that she will come to us, newly ordained, to undertake the equivalent of an apprenticeship for three or four years before moving on to have a parish of her own. Whilst training with us Hannah will also have training from the diocese and will have to undertake various assignments for them, consequently her time will not be solely spent on the parish.

On 3rd of July Hannah will be ordained deacon in the Cathedral. This means that she will be known as the Reverend Hannah Moore, and will wear a dog collar (and it will take most of the three years just to get used to that – and people saying “don’t swear in front of the vicar”), but will not be able to undertake certain tasks, primarily presiding at Holy Communion. However, she will be leading other services, including funerals.

A year later she will then be ordained priest in the Cathedral, at which point she will be able to do everything in the churches.

Hannah will be living with her family in the curate’s house on Sandy Hill and will be travelling round the churches and other places with Lesley and I in the early days, before branching out on her own. Please do make her welcome when she arrives in June.

Alan Crawley

Bishop Andrew’s Maundy Thursday Sermon

The Maundy Thursday Service at the Cathedral is perhaps my favourite service of the year – where we renew our commitment to the promises that we made as priests and receive the oils that we will use for the forthcoming year. I enjoyed the sermon from the bishop and the encouragement and the challenge of the service. I came away revitalised for another year in ministry.

Below is the sermon:

Guildford Cathedral, 2016

Luke 7, 36-50​

“The whole thing was an outrage. The behaviour of Simon the Pharisee was completely beyond the pail!

The woman – well, she behaved impeccably throughout. True, she was classified as a ‘sinner’ – possibly a euphemism for the town prostitute – but she’d heard Jesus, she’d seen him in action, and she loved him – so what better way to show that love than impulsively buying an expensive pot of perfumed ointment, gate-crashing a private party, wetting Jesus’ feet with her tears, kissing them and wiping them with her hair, then decanting the contents of her pot as lavishly as she possibly could? The whole thing seems perfectly reasonable: I’m sure you and I would have done just the same in the circumstances.

And what of Jesus? Well, he appeared completely untroubled throughout. Having the local prostitute letting down her hair in his presence; allowing her to touch him and anoint him with her ointment and tears in full view of Simon and all his nice Pharisaical friends; even holding up that woman as a role model, as an example of what great love really looks like. Well, that was quite reasonable as well, of course: just the sort of thing that happens to us all the time, in fact, whenever we host a meal for our nice Pharisaical friends.

But Simon: well, he behaved outrageously. He never gave Jesus a proper greeting – a welcome kiss, a little oil on his head, some water for his feet – he quietly seems to have snubbed his guest, doubting whether he was really a prophet at all. His motives in inviting Jesus along in the first place were distinctly mixed. Even the woman had a thing or two to teach him about gratitude, holiness and the love of God.

Read the rest of the sermon here

Who, me? A Vicar?

Bishop Andrew has been given the challenge of increasing the number of ordinations by at least 50% on 2013 figures sustained annually from 2020. This increase sounds massive, but it will not increase the number of priests in the Church of England – it will simply compensate for those retiring. This target comes from one of the papers produced for the Renewal and Reform initiative that Justin Welby, our Archbishop of Canterbury, is spearheading.

So how about you? Is there any possibility that God is calling you? For me it has been the most exciting and rewarding adventure of my life, in fact I have only really felt like I was being fully me since I started to explore my calling.

My advice would be to let nothing get between you and that thing that God is calling you to, whether that is ordained ministry or lay ministry or preaching in the church or teaching or being a plumber! Whatever that niggle is, it is worth pursuing it! If you think you aren’t good enough or that it is a ridiculous idea then don’t worry – you are in good company – most people think that when they first feel the tug of their vocation.

Young ordained vocations are particularly being encouraged because they have been so neglected in the past – see the video below. If you want to know more about any of this (and you are any age) speak to Alan or Lesley – 01252 820537