All posts by Lesley Crawley

Lesley is a priest in the Guildford Diocese

Introducing our LLM-in-training

 Hello from Wendy Edwards

A very big thank you, to all of you at St. John’s, for your warm welcome to me since I started worshipping with you on February 19th, 2017.  I look forward to worshipping at St. George’s and St. Mark’s over the summer and to gradually meeting you all.

I am approaching my final year of 4 years of training to be a Licensed Lay Minister and hope to be licensed in June 2018, God willing. I feel excited and grateful to Lesley and Alan that I am now joining the Ministry Team in the Parish of Badshot Lea and Hale.

I was born in Lincolnshire but we moved to Upper Weybourne Lane with my family in 1962 when I was 5 and we moved to Roman Way when I was 9. I attended primary and secondary schools in Farnham. I left home to live in Wimbledon when I was 18, worked in the law and taught Keep Fit classes and returned to Farnham recently, after 41 years away, to live in Oast House Crescent with my husband, Steve.  We have 2 grown up children and a young grandson. We are very grateful to live in such a beautiful, peaceful location.

Sadly, my mum, Jean Parratt, died on my 59th birthday last October. She was known to many of you for her Museum on a Shoestring talks, her work on the Farnham Diary and at Farnham Museum and her 10 books about Farnham.

Through my grief, I have found it heart-warming to benefit from the high regard in which she was held by so many Farnham people. The unique legacy she has left the people of Farnham has buoyed us up immensely and it has helped me to feel seamlessly included in the Farnham community which she loved so much.

I was a bridesmaid twice at St. John’s for my late Uncle Francis when he married Auntie Sally in April 1966 and for my Auntie Margaret and Uncle Geoff. Here is a photo of me at their wedding (I am the dark haired 11-year-old bridesmaid) with my late sister, Debbie (the younger, blonde, bridesmaid) on 25th January 1969.  I look a bit different now and don’t wear turquoise velvet much nowadays! I do look forward to chatting to you over coffee after a service in the coming months.

Best wishes, Wendy Edwards

Parish Fete

It was very exciting bringing the fete to Badshot Lea this year – everything needed planning from scratch.    We started planning, a small team, people from all four of our congregations.   We set a date, 10th June, making sure we did not clash with the schools or Farnham Carnival – the raffle tickets went to the printers and the applications for the necessary licences were made and our entertainers were invited -but then panic set in as we realised that St. George’s hall had been booked for that date!   (Note to self, the hall is booked a lot now!)   We were truly blessed – everything was able to be changed, with no extra cost, and our new date was set for 3rd June.   I’m sure the Lord as with us, because we couldn’t have asked for a better day.

Friday evening, thunder storms were forecast, but it was fine and warm.  Tombola prizes were ticketed, tables collected from the school,  brave people climbed up the ladder and strung bunting from the flag pole and with a lot of help, the grounds became festive.    No one could have missed that there was something going on at the Church.

Saturday started early, the sun shone, it was warm but not too hot.  Perfect fete weather.  The bouncy castle arrived and the beer was delivered.    Mentioning beer, a huge ‘Thank You’ to the Shepherd and Flock, who donated a barrel of beer and 30 single bottles of Prosecco, an incredible gift.  We must also thank all those businesses who donated prizes for the raffle and the auction – and those trusty people who sent out letters and visited with smiles and pleas for ‘just a little something for the Parish Fete’.

By 9.45 it was really busy, tables were set up, goods brought out and our DJ got us in the mood.  The hall was turned into the ‘cool café, the maypole took centre stage. The BBQ started to smell enticing and we gave a cry of ‘Help, who knows how to tap a barrel?’.  Cups of tea and coffee kept everyone  going – the kitchen was busy and then suddenly it was 12.00.

A group of children opened the fete and the fun began.    Fingersmith and the Rocking Thumbs, an amazingly good band of young rock stars began our entertainment and performed later in the day before rushing off to a gig in Farnham.    The children from Badshot Lea School were delightful as they wound the Maypole.    Some of the grown ups wanted a go…. Not quite as successfully!   Children’s faces were painted and they loved the games and activities.    Prizes were being won and stalls sold lots of delectable items.   The afternoon progressed and became a real village affair.  Passers-by popped in and stayed.   The beer tent was busy and there was a lovely relaxed atmosphere with people having teas, eating burgers and enjoying the sun.    The Carillon Singers came along to entertain, performing in the Church and were, as always, excellent.  Olivia Jasper sang and played beautifully entertaining those in the café and sitting by the bar.

The afternoon was rounded off with the auction and the Grand Raffle.  The crowds went home, happy and slightly sun burned.  Lots of people lent a hand and before long everything was cleared away and we were putting the Church back together.  We were all exhausted but very happy.

The final total is about £2,500 – which is about £500 more than last year.   An incredible effort by everyone concerned.  There are too many people to thank individually and you know who you are.    It was a real team effort and a great bit of outreach, fun and fellowship.

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Maxine Everitt

 

 

Thy Kingdom come – praying with psalms

Do you ever wake up to find your partner’s put the radio on in the small hours of the morning? In our case, it’s a sure sign that Lesley’s got something on her mind and is having deep and profound thoughts about it at 3 o’clock in the morning. It could be sermon writing or holiday booking, but in this case it was the exhibition recently held at St John’s.

“Thy Kingdom Come” is an annual international Christian initiative supported by the Church of England. The idea is to have a “wave of prayer” between Ascension and Pentecost (25th May – 4th June). Last year, the emphasis was on the Lord’s Prayer and our parish held an art exhibition illustrating and focussing attention on this. This year, we didn’t have such definite guidelines, so it was decided within the parish to use the psalms as our basis.

Lesley spent a lot of time perusing the psalms and finding ones that would be suitable for illustration. The artists of the parish, and Farnham in general, were then sidled up to and it was suggested they might like to produce works to be displayed in St John’s. To our delight (and slight surprise), thumbscrews were not necessary and most artists were thoroughly enthused by the idea.

So, works were commissioned, checks made occasionally to see that the artists hadn’t forgotten, but despite the smooth running, such events always generate a certain amount of stress – hence the 3am panics. Do we have enough easels? (No, we purchased and borrowed some more.) We haven’t got enough small tables! (Hooray for “The Range” in Aldershot. Four tables purchased for £9.99 each.)

So the afternoon before Ascension several of us assembled in St John’s to put the exhibition up. The contributors ranged in age from seven to seventy and the art works showed a fascinating range of imagination that does credit to all involved. I did a slight double take as I stood on a precariously propped up stepladder to mount Alison’s picture high up on a column (I’m H&S officer – should I be doing this?). However the end result was one we were very pleased with. The comments book indicated we were justified in this.

The event finished with a Pentecost party on the afternoon of Sunday 4th June, in which tea and scones, music and singing featured prominently. Thanks to all involved.

Altogether a nice parish event. Not earth-shattering in its impact, but:-
“The least you do for Jesus will be precious in his sight”

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Bob Shatwell

St John’s Survey Responses

An open session and display to discuss the possible future of St John’s Church, Hale, will be held next Saturday, 27th May, at the church from 10am to 2pm.

The discussion will centre around the ideas generated from responses to a recent survey sent out to residents living close to the church. This asked for their ideas about how to ensure the church remains open in the long-term and how it can be used for the local community during the week as well as on a Sunday.

The survey was delivered to 1,700 houses in Hale. The overall response was positive to the idea of the ‘interior of the church being altered to create a space for complementary uses, while maintaining worship as its primary use’.

Ideas include removing the pews and replacing them with chairs which would be used in church services including baptisms, weddings and funerals, and also allowing complementary uses during the week such as a soft play area, a cafe, and groups offering support for those suffering with addictions or needing debt counselling. The space created could also be used for art exhibitions, or for orchestra and choir recitals.

One respondent commented that by “removing the dark pews and replacing them with bright comfortable chairs will create a versatile space and be lighter”.  Another said: “as much as I love the pews, they do limit the way the space can be used and make worship very formal and perhaps for many do not foster a feeling of participation and equality”.

However, for some of those who responded, the idea of reordering the interior of the church is painful and difficult.  A respondent who regards himself as a traditionalist sad that he could “see the need to increase usage of the church for other activities apart from church services” but would “just have to accept it as progress”. However, another added: “St John’s will remain beautiful whatever happens and to me will feel more beautiful if the building is more full of life”.

The feedback session with refreshments will run from 10am to 2pm on 27th May 27. Come along to discuss some ideas and options for the future of St John’s.

For further information, contact Rev’d Hannah Moore on 01252 659267, email revd.hannah@badshotleaandhale.org or visit https://badshotleaandhale.org

Election Results 2017 (PCC not Country!)

At the Annual Church Meetings held on Sunday 30th April the following were elected:

Ex Officio
Lesley Crawley
Alan Crawley
Lesley Shatwell
Hannah Moore

Churchwardens:
Carol Le Page
Pamela Marsham
Bob Shatwell

Deputy Churchwardens:
Margaret Emberson
Maxine Everitt

PCC Members:
John Boas
Gemma Brown
Sylvie Burrows
Angela Hall
Kris Lawrence
Annie Thomas
Bill Thomas
Diana Thomas
Stella Wiseman

Co-opted Members:
Sarah Kay
Vicky Kidney

Other Church Officers

Secretary:
Gemma Brown

Treasurer:
Sarah Kay

Safeguarding Officer
Maurice Emberson

Electoral Roll Officer
Jennifer Paterson

Stewardship Officer
Peter Paterson

Some thoughts on conflict

At St George’s we have been having a series of ‘Vision Hours’ where we consider many things to do with the life, work and mission of our church. At the most recent session we thought about conflict as we have experience some of it recently! Conflict in churches can often feel frightening because we don’t expect it – we expect churches to be peaceful and tolerant, when they aren’t we are surprised. Moreover, most people of faith are deeply passionate about the things to do with faith – the beliefs, the community, the buildings, the mission, the words we use, the music we play, the way we do things. Hence, conflict in churches can feel more highly charged than conflict in other arenas.

However, conflict in the church is as old as the church itself. God in God’s wisdom decided to make us all different, and hence we all have different priorities and ideas. Sometimes these things complement each other and sometimes these things cause tension. In every age the church has struggled to recreate itself so that it can be relevant to the community that it serves. Communities never stay the same and neither do churches. However, change is invariably uncomfortable and leads to conflict.

A group called Bridge Builders have a great deal of wisdom on the subject of conflict. They help churches when conflict becomes painful and destructive. Over the years they have developed an understanding of helpful conflict and unhelpful conflict:

Unhelpful Conflict Helpful Conflict
1. Conflict viewed as wrong and sinful 1. Conflict viewed as inevitable and evidence of involvement
2. Members spiritualise conflict – equate their own view with that of God 2. Members draw from spiritual resources – listening, confession and prayer
3. Members blur issues and people – relationships suffer, people given a cold response. 3. Members separate issues and people – relationships maintained with those who disagree and differ.
4. Leaders discourage expressions of difference and plead for harmony. 4. Leaders encourage expressions of difference and they too can disagree with others.
5. Indirect communication flourishes – talk about people, not to them 5. Direct communication is maintained and clarification sought.
6. Members hoard up hurts and offences. 6. Members keep short accounts with each other.
7. In the stress of conflict, a few vocal people are heard, intimidating the other people. 7. In the stress of conflict, many voices are heard and people are energized by debate.
8. Members react explosively or defensively to the views of others 8. Members interact thoughtfully to the views of others.
9. Discussions focus on positions and people get stuck in their own position. 9. Discussions focus on the process and the problem and only later on possible solutions.
10. Low tolerance of uncertainty and members want issues over and done with. 10. Members able to move calmly through inevitable periods of uncertainty.
11. People repress inner conflicts caused by past experiences and continually project them into the church conflict. 11. People are consciously aware of their past hurts or unresolved conflicts and take responsibility not to project them into the current situation.

 

It might be a surprise to find that conflict can be helpful, but more than being helpful, it is in many cases essential. Conflict forms community and builds intimacy. It is one of the stages of community:

Four Stages of Community

A well-known psychologist, M. Scott Peck, says that any group of people who previously don’t know each other who come together form a community that goes through four stages:

Pseudo-community

People want to be loving and kind. It is a pleasant place to be. In order to achieve this, people withhold some of the truth of themselves. Differences are minimised or ignored.

Chaos/Conflict

Eventually, some differences will appear. This is a shock. It is no fun. It is uncomfortable and unpleasant. We want it to go back to the niceness and comfort we knew before. Eventually, we can bear it no more, we look at who is to blame and the blame is attached to a variety of things until it rests on the leader who bears the brunt of the anger of the community.

From here the community can find its way back to psudo-community or they can walk the painful path through emptiness and grief:

Emptiness/Grief

Members empty themselves of the barriers to communication. They become honest and within each member mini deaths occur – preconception, expectations, projections, ideology. Members start to share their own brokenness, fears failures and defeats.

True community

True community embraces the light and the darkness. The joy and the reality of human failing. A genuine peace descends. When people speak others listen without trying to fix. The community becomes a place of incredible healing.

Traditional Church Fete with a Modern Twist

Everyone welcome at traditional church fete with a modern twist

St George’s Church, Badshot Lea, will be the venue for this year’s annual parish fete, a traditional church fete with a modern twist, on Saturday, June 3, 12-3pm.

The church and grounds will be full of stalls and activities designed to appeal across the ages. There will be a ‘cool cafe’, serving refreshments with mellow music playing, plus a bar and barbecue. Children from Badshot Lea school will give a dance display at 12.30pm and the Carillon Singers will perform in the church at 1.15pm as well as leading some community singing.

A children’s craft area will be set up inside the church and outside there will be a bouncy castle and stalls with things to buy, games to play and prizes to win.
Grand raffle tickets will be on sale with the raffle drawn at the end of the event. Everyone is welcome.

For further information call Maxine on 01252 318135, email maxine.everitt@live.co.uk or visit https://badshotleaandhale.org/

Quiz night 2017!

The Third Annual Fun Quiz was a great night. We welcomed a mix of Parishioner’s, family and friends.

The ‘singing’ Quiz Master returned to St George’s to host the evening and challenge the teams on subjects from their General Knowledge to their memory recall in the Generation Game! Tastebuds were exercised in the juice round and even Trumpton and Camberwick Green took centre stage. There was lots of fun and laughter and the quiz culminated in the quick fire Lego round.

The Quiz and raffle raised an amazing £400 for church funds.

Thank you to everyone who came and took part and we hope to see more of you next year.

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Carrie & Jason Grafham and Chris Brown

Not just on a Sunday: Survey looks at new ways of using local church

An open session and display to discuss the possible future of St John’s Church, Hale, will be held next Saturday, 27th May, at the church from 10am to 2pm.

The discussion will centre around the ideas generated from responses to a recent survey sent out to residents living close to the church. This asked for their ideas about how to ensure the church remains open in the long-term and how it can be used for the local community during the week as well as on a Sunday.

The survey was delivered to 1,700 houses in Hale. The overall response was positive to the idea of the ‘interior of the church being altered to create a space for complementary uses, while maintaining worship as its primary use’.

Ideas include removing the pews and replacing them with chairs which would be used in church services including baptisms, weddings and funerals, and also allowing complementary uses during the week such as a soft play area, a cafe, and groups offering support for those suffering with addictions or needing debt counselling. The space created could also be used for art exhibitions, or for orchestra and choir recitals.

One respondent commented that by “removing the dark pews and replacing them with bright comfortable chairs will create a versatile space and be lighter”. Another said: “as much as I love the pews, they do limit the way the space can be used and make worship very formal and perhaps for many do not foster a feeling of participation and equality”.

However, for some of those who responded, the idea of reordering the interior of the church is painful and difficult. A respondent who regards himself as a traditionalist sad that he could “see the need to increase usage of the church for other activities apart from church services” but would “just have to accept it as progress”. However, another added: “St John’s will remain beautiful whatever happens and to me will feel more beautiful if the building is more full of life”.

The feedback session with refreshments will run from 10am to 2pm on 27th May 27. Come along to discuss some ideas and options for the future of St John’s.

For further information, contact Rev’d Hannah Moore on 01252 659267, email revd.hannah@badshotleaandhale.org or visit https://badshotleaandhale.org